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EtherNet/IP

(8/31/2015)

EtherNet/IPTM Scanner

The EIP4CCPU is an EtherNet/IP™ Scanner for the iQ Platform. It allows the iQ Platform to talk with other Ethernet/IP connected third party CPUs such as ControlLogix or CompactLogix to share data, and to directly control EtherNet/IP distributed devices such as I/O (Block or Point), drives, and other devices. The scanner is configured using the EIP4CCPU Scanner Configuration Utility (a free utility that can be downloaded at meau.com). The EIP4CCPU Scanner Configuration Utility discovers and configures the network settings of a scanner regardless of its network parameters, making it very easy to setup a new module or reconfigure an existing module.

Required Manual

Model Number

Description

Contents

Included?

Stocked Item

ICC-#10816

EIP4CCPU User’s Manual

Covers EIP4CCPU

Yes

-

Model Number

EIP4CCPU

Stocked Item

-

Number of Client TCP Connections

32 (*1)

Number of Server TCP Connections

8

PLCs Supported on Backplane

1 to 3

Changing Configuration During Operation

Yes (*2)

Client Class 1 Implicit (I/O) Messaging

CIP Connections

60 (*3)

Total Combined Input and
Output Data Size

Up to 14KB (high speed shared memory limitation)

Max Data Size

511 bytes

Connection Type (Target to Originator)

Multicast (*4)

Transport Trigger

Cyclic

Data Type

SINT, USINT

RPI

1 to 8388ms

Minimum Timeout Time

128ms (timeout multiplier is adjusted according to the RPI)

Client Explicit Messaging

Class 3 CIP Connections (Connected)

16 (*3, *5)

UCMM (Unconnected)

16 outstanding requests (*5)

Max Data Size

120 words

Connection Type (Target to Originator)

Point-to-Point

Cache Type

Un-cached

Transport Trigger

Application

Data Type

INT, UINT

RPI

7500ms

Timeout Multiplier

4x

Tag Access Methods

Data table read/write, Typed read/write, CIP generic

PLC Implementation

Based on populating internal PLC registers with a predefined messaging structure

Server Class 3 Explicit Messaging

CIP Connections

16

Max Data Size

250 words

Connection Type (Target to Originator)

T->O Point-to-Point

Transport Trigger

Application

Data Type

INT, UINT

RPI

1 to 8388ms

Timeout Multiplier

4x to 512x

Tag Access Methods

Data table read/write, Typed read/write, CIP generic

PLC Implementation

Predefined device mappings

Notes:

  1. The client TCP and CIP connections share a common resource pool. The number of TCP and CIP connections is dependent upon one another and must satisfy the following formulas:
    1. (Number of TCP connections * 4) + (Number of CIP connections) <= 160
    2. (Number of CIP connections) <= 60
  2. If configuration is changed via EtherNet/IP by editing the Connection Configuration objects (RSNetWorx for EtherNet/IP method), the configuration will take effect immediately without rebooting the device. If the configuration is transferred as an XML file via FTP to the device (Windows® Configuration Utility method), a reboot is required for the configuration to take effect.
  3. The number of simultaneous class 1 connections lists the total number of simultaneous I/O connections that can be made to remote devices, regardless of whether or not those devices are being served by a single adapter at one IP address (modular devices such as Flex I/O and Point I/O will consume one class 1 connection for each module attached to the chassis/adapter). Because the scanner supports up to 128 TCP connections (sockets), up to 128 simultaneous physical remote devices (adapters) can be attached to. At the same time, the scanner contains a pool of 256 class 1 CIP connections and 16 class 3 CIP connections. So, for example, if the scanner is configured to target one Flex I/O adapter with three modules on the chassis, then it will use the following internal resources: one TCP connection and three class 1 CIP connections. Additionally, if the user wants a connected explicit messaging request to target (for example) module #2 on the chassis, then this will consume one of the 16 class 3 CIP connections (so in total, one TCP connection, three class 1 CIP connections, and one class 3 CIP connection will be in use). During configuration, the user can keep adding connections until they run out of either TCP connections or 17 ICC class 1 connections. For example, if the network contains a large number of modular devices with multiple modules on each adapter, then it is likely that the pool of class 1 CIP connections will be exhausted first. On the other hand, if the network does not contain any modular devices, then only one class 1 CIP connection will be required for each TCP connection, and it is therefore likely that the number of TCP connections will be exhausted first.
  4. Up to 20 unique multicast addresses are supported per TCP connection.
  5. Both connected and unconnected explicit messaging requires the use of interrupts. Each interrupt can only service one outstanding explicit message at any given time. Since there are only 16 interrupts, the total number of outstanding connected and unconnected explicit messages cannot exceed 16.